Porsche Drivers 'More Likely To Speed'

Porsche drivers 'more likely to speed'

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According to the latest research commissioned by MoneySupermarket.com, people living in Bournemouth are statistically the most likely to be caught speeding whilst those in London are the least likely.

As shown in the infographic, based on data collected from the latest MoneySupermarket Motor Monitor, 12.3 per cent of drivers living in Bournemouth, who were retrieving car insurance quotes, have indicated that they have had speeding convictions.

They managed to out-do the people of Dorcester, Liverpool and Norwich by taking top spot, ahead of their figures of 11.8 per cent, 11.4 per cent and 11.3 per cent respectively.

In contrast to this, the drivers who are least likely to be caught speeding are predominantly from London and, in general, the South East of the UK.

With only five per cent of drivers in certain London areas indicating that they have had speeding convictions and 5.2 per cent of drivers in Ilford admitting the same, London drivers occupy four out of five places in the 'least likely to speed' section of the Infographic - with the final place going to their South East neighbours Canterbury, with a total of 5.4 per cent of driver's caught speeding.

Not only is speeding incredibly dangerous, for both the occupants of vehicles and pedestrians, being caught by the authorities can also have a massive impact on your car insurance premiums.

Trying to insurance a vehicle can be very expensive if you possess outstanding speeding convictions or have done so in the past, as the resulting penalties ultimately affect a driver's car insurance premiums in light of them being perceived as a higher risk.

Also according to MoneySupermarket Motor Monitor, drivers of Porsche motors are statistically the most likely to get caught speeding, with 14.2 per cent of Porsche owners retrieving car insurance quotes from MoneySupermarket highlighting the fact that they had been caught speeding previously.

Porsche drivers came out just ahead of Aston Martin and Jaguar owners, who came second and third in the list, respectively, with 14.1 per cent and 13 per cent of owners having been caught speeding previously.

Owners of older of classic vehicles were found to be the least likely to attract a speeding conviction, according to the Infographic, with owners of a Morris vehicle being found to be the least likely to speed, with only 4.6 per cent of them having done so, as well as Proton motorists featuring in the same list with only six cent having been caught speeding.

Topping the list for most likely car models to be caught speeding by the authorities is the Jaguar XK, with 20.9 per cent of owners of this vehicle admitting to being caught speeding.

The Jaguar XK narrowly beat the Audi A5 and BMW 6 Series to first place, with 19.8 per cent and 19.7 per cent, respectively, of owners having been caught breaking the speed limit. This seems to be a more obvious outcome as people usually want to test out their sport or luxury cars to their potential - getting their money's worth as they may think.

The owners of the outdated Rover Metro and Rover 114 models shared the last place spot on the likely-to-speed list, with only 4.1 per cent of owners retrieving their car insurance through MoneySupermarket indicating that they have previously been caught speeding by the authorities.

Joining these two vehicles at the bottom of the list are the discontinued Proton Savvy and the still-available Hyundai Amica, registering figures of 4.2 per cent and 4.1 per cent correspondingly.

Most likely to speed, in terms of occupations, are operations directors and surgeons, with 23.1 per cent and 23 per cent of people in these professions having been caught speeding.

Unsurprisingly, driving instructors feature at the reverse end of the list, with only 3.3 per cent of those in the profession having previous speeding tickets - although they were beaten to the bottom spot by warehousewomen, registering a figure of 3.2 per cent.